Dartmouth Researcher Honored with 2010 NIEHS Karen Wetterhahn Award

Courtney Kozul-Horvath, PhD, was awarded the 2010 Karen Wetterhahn Memorial Award by the Superfund Research Program of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. (photo by Joseph Mehling ’69)

Dartmouth researcher Courtney Kozul-Horvath, PhD, is the recipient of the 2010 Karen Wetterhahn Memorial Award, which was presented November 12, 2010, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon.

Kozul-Horvath was cited for her work with Joshua Hamilton, PhD, and Bruce Stanton, PhD, at Dartmouth Medical School, as part of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program examining the harmful effects of constant environmental exposure to arsenic in drinking water at or below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s standard of 10 parts per billion.

Kozul-Horvath demonstrated that low-level arsenic exposure in mice significantly impaired the immune response in the lung, which led to increased morbidity following influenza infection.

Karen Wetterhahn was a chemistry professor at Dartmouth College and the founder of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program. Shortly after her tragic death in 1997, the NIEHS began presenting an award in her memory to recognize an outstanding graduate student or post-doctoral researcher that best exemplifies the qualities exhibited by Dr. Wetterhahn.

Read the full story at DMHC News.