Dartmouth Events

1917 Centennial Series: Stephen Kotkin, Princeton University

War, Revolution, Socialism, War: How do the events of 1917 and thereafter help us understand the world of today, and perhaps of tomorrow?

Monday, September 18, 2017
4:30pm-6:00pm
Haldeman 41 (Kreindler Conference Hall)
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories: Lectures & Seminars

 

Mary and Peter R. Dallman 1951 Great Issues Lecture

War, Revolution, Socialism, War

Stephen Kotkin, John P. Birkelund '52 Professor in History and International Affairs; Co-Director, Program in History and the Practice of Diplomacy; Director, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Sept 18  |  4:30pm  |  041 Haldeman Center  |  Free and open to all. 

Revolution in the Russian empire took place 100 years ago, during the First World War.  It brought widespread hopes for a new world. During the course of that year, the revolutionary process in Russia radicalized toward socialism, in part because the horrific war did not end. Socialism was supposed to bring an end to such wars.  Socialism in power and the perceived threats of its spread reinforced a trend toward a radicalization of the right, the advent of fascism. Within a generation, another titanic war broke out, even worse than the first one. How do these events of 1917 and thereafter help us understand the world of today, and perhaps of tomorrow?

Sponsors: The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, The Leslie Center for the Humanities, The Political Economy Project, The Department of Government, The Department of Russian, The Department of History, and The Department of Film and Media Studies.  

 

For more information, contact:
Sharon Tribou-St. Martin

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.